About your Search

20121001
20121009
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12
, fish hatcheries. i could go on all day. it is transforming america's approach to energy, education, health care, transportation and more. it is one of the most important and least understood pieces of legislation in modern american history. the short term recovery part as well as the long term investment part. it is also the purist distillation of what obama meant by change. it is a major down payment on all of his biggest campaign promises. the story of the stimulus not only fun and gripping story but it is a microcosm of the obama era. the best way to understand the president, his policies, his approach to politics, his achievements and his troubled marketing this achievement in a city that has gone bonkers. also the best way to understand his enemies. this book documents the republican plot to destroy obama before he even took office. you always heard about it and imagine it must be there but i got these guys to tell me about it. these secret meetings where eric cantor and mitch mcconnell plan their paths to power. before i open this up to what you want to talk about i want to t
on the front fear of the world economy. and we need to enleash america's energy entrepreneurs as well. the u.s. can overcome the energy crisis in a few years by merely unleashing the natural gas and oil of technology that tran formed the petroleum industry in the last five years the hornet tal tracking and other things that made it possible the smaller footprint on the surface reach fuel than in the past. it's the green energy sources that consume the most valuable part of the global environment which is the surface of the earth. you have solar cells and wind mills and beau owe fuel and all of these while ignoring the almost energy below the surface of the earth. that can be reached with a small footprint on the earth's. >> george, what is al true rich. how does it fit. >> an orientation toward the need of others. that's an i believe capitalism is intrinsically altruistic. that is to say that capitalism is based on making investments without any assurance that others will respond to them. capitalist investments only work if say that respond imaginatively need of ores. i think capitalism is i
also written my book have been in the area of gender. i have written a lot also in energy economics and in taxation. i'm a monthly column nist for this. i edited a bock called overcoming barriers to imeerpship. i wouldn't say it's a radical thing. social security something i've been thinking about it and writing about far long time. thank you for joining us on booktive. >> it's great to be with you. >> coming up from booktv coverage from the annual libertarian contest. economist george talks about new edition of the 1981 best selling book. this is just over thirty minutes. [inaudible conversations] george, you have a new audition of "wealth and poverty" how. has country changed since the original came out. >> it habit changed auto. we have a new carter in office and president obama so most of the themes that of
storage of natural shale gas which may make it an energy power into the 21st century so this is within geography. estimate your argument about russia and russians in security would basically be it's too flat. >> it has half of the world's longitude, but it's flat, it's indefensible, its rivers run north and south rather than east and west so they don't unite the country and it has less people than bangladesh. 141 million people bangladesh has more people commesso vladimir putin's cynical neo imperialism are the wages of the could be the geographical and security and that is how we should understand it not as a mad man or a totalitarian but as a very traditional russian autocrat. >> one of the interesting pictures of this book is your discussion of the fall of the berlin wall and if i read you right to say that it made us too optimistic. our system of democracy and free markets would have a transforming power. talk about that and take that story through the 1980's and 90's. >> the berlin wall and eliminated constraints. we thought because we could get the red army out of eastern europe
in sheer energy of one person, we now have a hot website and live streaming video of our event, national press club in several supporting lectures and presentations. you all know that one person is the lifeblood of the anisfield-wolf book awards, my dear friend and comrade, mary louise hunt. give it up for mary louise. stand up, mary louise. [applause] our annual ceremony has become an event in cleveland social intellectual calendar and that takes an entire team of people to pull off, including ron of course, but also sandy shoals. cindy, please stand up in the six other team members who have worked for months to create this evening. give it up to cindy. [applause] as mary louise put it to me just yesterday, and i quote an e-mail, making sure it's going to be here, she e-mailed me three times and called me when i was on the plane. i mean, it was terrible. i was coming. i start to get my shoes shined in each of us had. i'm quoting from her e-mail to show her that i do read them, even if i do ignore them. edith anisfield-wolf she wrote was a quiet and reserved person would be astonished an
. but we are very lucky. and i think the energy market. also one being in my book is i haven't seen any of this year and 10 u.s., but now doing a pilot on the infrastructure and we try to use their brain for their solutions for energy. >> i am an israeli. i was born there. others raise their. as an israeli now, either argumentative, but this is not the forum for arguments. i am also a guest here. i enlaces gaston we're not supposed to attack, although you tempt me greatly. >> we can do that in israel. >> after my house we can do that. not everybody in israel is in agreement with you. there's many experienced people, smart people, don't hold on to your point of view. i have a very simple question. israel is a mighty country. it is the strongest country in the middle east. israel has a clichÉ of atomic weapons. for many years, they obtained like we used to do historically to obtain arms and my young days under the british magnum. all right, do you think there is any bets, bit of connection between israel being a nuclear power and iran and other nations in the middle east striving to reac
in and in an instant it is change and the senate is the center of governmental energy and creativity. the founding fathers wanted -- he is majority leader for six years. at the end of six years he leaves and the senate is back in the same mess. the nature of political genius is to find a way when no way appears obvious. i don't have any idea what president johnson would do with this congress. hopefully i can research and find out but someone will come along to do it again. >> one of the major events that occurred was the u.s. role in the overthrow -- johnson is on record in the cabinet meetings opposing it. can you elaborate on what particularly drove his stance and what particularly was it on that and why he believed the way he did on that point? one of the things he agreed with robert kennedy on. >> can i take a pass on that one question? it is at the beginning of the book i writing now. the answer is so complicated and i don't have a summation of it on my mind right now. >> can i go back and referred to your book you are talking about now? you alluded when you stated the united states was runni
, her driving energy and her unwavering ambition, and her indomitable drive. but within a short time she realized he was and in court jubal drunk. -- in court jubal drunk. and despite his own international celebrity, he could not spare her rising thing. rebecca west who have met thompson in london in 1921, whom jim spoke about in his introduction, and later when dorothy was a chief of the bureau in berlin, was as courageous and as an domino ball as american friend, possibly more so. kindred spirits intent on breaking through that concrete ceiling of male-dominated literature and journalism. they both were intent on confronting the pivotal issues of their times head-on. and they would remain friends all of their lives. rebecca west had as humble a beginning as dorothy thompson eric she was born so silly isabel fairfield on the outskirts of london in 1892 to a scotch highland mother with musical aspirations, and a truly gifted journalist father. when he left them, abandoned them to poverty, when she, too, was only eight, she was both devastated and liberated. as angry as she was, she, like
, factory floor, and it has to transform education. second two is debt and receive dit and energy and climate. >> host: next call from indiana, is it dewit? >> caller: my question is from mr. friedman. i remember what you're talking about, the economy being the most senseless partnership of the government and the private sector. i wonder where that partnership stands right now? i mean, have we been witnessing the decline of the state in that partnership in recent years? i'm asking this as a recent immigrant to the united states, you know, someone who is really concerned. thank you very much. >> guest: what a wonderful question. i appreciate that. that is really a core argument of our book that what made america great was we had this amazing public-private partnership, and the public basically provided the foundation for our market economy and our great entrepreneurs to really launch into the world. what was that public side? educated people, up and beyond whatever the technology was, have the world's best infrastructure, roads, airport, tell come, bandwidth, the open immigration h
king jr.. and now thanks to the vision, commitment and shared energy of one person, we now have a hot web site and live streaming video of our event, national press coverage and several cavorting lectures and presentations and you know who that one person is. she is the lifeblood of the anisfeld-wolf book awards, my dear friend and comrade mary louise khan. give it up for mary louise. stand up, mary louise. [applause] our annual ceremony has become an important event on cleveland social and intellectual calendar and that takes an entire team of people including ron of course but also cindy schultz. cindy, please stand up in the six other team members who have worked for months to create this evening. give it up for cindy. [applause] as married with louise put it to me just yesterday and i quote the e-mail making sure i was going to be here, the e-mail -- called me when i was on the plane. i stop to get a shoe shine and she almost had a heart attack. i'm quoting from her e-mail to shove her that i do read them even if i do ignore them. [laughter] edith anisfeld-wolf she wrote was a qui
. and though anthony himself was a gifted writer, he chose to siphon his creative energy by punishing his mother for his illegitimate birth. she became through his eyes force of deception, corruption, and mendacity. but it may be said that neither west now are wells, nor thompson nor lewis, had the slightest notion of how to love one another, or their sons. although thompson and west were flawed and imperfect heroines, we are the beneficiaries of their legacy, undaunted courage, in domino ball energy, -- indomitable energy, "speaking truth to power" regardless of its costs. they grappled with the great political and moral issues of their times so that we might harness and clarify their vision to meet the imposing exigencies of our print. thank you so much for coming and for listening. [applause] >> and. >> if you have questions, we have two microphones on either side of the center section. please let us know if you have questions. susan hertog is going to answer them for just a few minutes. thank you. >> you mentioned that thompson left for england with $150. really without any track reco
raw and powerful, words and energy, which included gay sexuality in a very matter-of-fact way. they got all this attention, people were reading it and people could talk about the sexuality in a way that they had them before. >> we are talking up with christopher bram. this is the most recent book. is this your first nonfiction? >> yes, estimate of comedy writers who changed america, the first call comes from randy in salsa, oklahoma. >> how are you all doing? >> i have a question about the doj five group that was established in the 1970s. a group at the federal level and what effect it had on national security are you the fellow that was on turkey mountain? by the way, you can google this, she is the sister of a whistleblower who has been exposed to some of the activities with janet reno and so forth to when you are talking about the doj project, you are talking about the department of justice, right? >> guest: i'm not sure. >> host: peter, we will move on to you. >> caller: we are now enjoying the coolness in charleston, for a change. >> i just turned the tv on, so i may have
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12